Where to Get Filipiniana Costume for Buwan ng Wika

barot saya

At this time of year (month of August), this blog often gets a lot of search referrals about Filipiniana costumes for Buwan ng Wika. If you’ve landed here, you’re probably one of those who wish to know where to get Filipiniana costumes for yourself or for your kids. Here’s a quick guide:

Wet Market – Or what we normally call palengke. Head to the section where clothes and slippers are sold and you might find costumes there. Usual price for every set starts at Php 250. It might be higher for adult costumes.

SM Department Store – Check out the Philippine souvenirs section of every SM mall and you’re likely to find nice sets of Filipiniana costumes. Compared to palengke price, however, they’re quite expensive. The cheapest set that I found (it’s a baro’t saya) costs about Php 500. But the material seems sturdy so it might be worth purchasing if you think you can use this costume many times over.

Quiapo, Baclaran and Divisoria – These are places where you can find Filipiniana costumes for Buwan ng Wika year round. You can even find tailors there who can design a costume for you. I’m not familiar with the cost anymore, but the price should be reasonable. Might be best to bring at least Php 1,000 to get a set of costume and a pair of abaca slippers.

Olx.ph – If you don’t have time to scour the market stalls, search for “Filipiniana costumes for sale” at Olx.ph or eBay.ph. Just don’t expect marked-down prices all the time because some sellers tend to profit from shipping cost. Best to look for online sellers near your place for possible meet-ups.

30-Minute Art Journaling

I thought I said before that I got too busy since the new school year commenced. That seems like an understatement now. I think I’ll be seeing major piles of work and concern in the next few weeks, months and most likely in the years to come. Anyway, I’m not complaining. I’m just documenting that fact. It’s good to be busy and to serve the people you love — and to yearn for that pocket of time to do some art at my desk upstairs. Sneaking in and drawing and doodling seem so exciting! ;o)

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Lately I’ve been doing a lot of quick-style art journaling. I manage to do a page or two in a day, a good 30 minutes for each artwork. It’s been a source of relaxation for me, especially when I have to deal with headaches and eyestrain due to prolonged computer work.

I usually just do line and wash when art journaling for half an hour. I use my pan sets so I wouldn’t have to wash a palette every time. In the photo above I used my Prang and Koh-I-Noor watercolor sets, a #10 round brush, Sakura Pigma Micron 04 drawing pen (for writing the text), and Artline 3.0 calligraphy pen (to draw the borders).

All for now. Do check out my social media links at the top of this page. Thanks and see you around!

Comparing Color Intensity and Texture from Different Mediums

I’m not one to make swatches for every set of medium that I have, but I do make an effort to study a color’s intensity, strength and texture when I deem it necessary. On this art journal page, I compared yellows from four different color mediums.

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From top to bottom:

Caran D’Ache Neocolour II (water-soluble artist crayon pastel) – If this crayon were a person, I’d describe it as someone with refined personality. I like that it allows me to gradually increase the intensity of the yellow. There’s no sudden rush of color and you don’t get smooched even when you add water to it using a paintbrush.

Lyra Gel Crayon (water-soluble gel stick) – I’ve had the 12 set for some time now and I use it mostly for art journaling. I haven’t thought about using them on canvas or other substrate. If you’re a fan of thick, creamy and intense colors, you’ll like gel crayons.

Conte Carres Crayon – I’m using the Conte crayons as alternative to traditional soft pastels. I use them for lining a watercolor subject or to just add a bit of shadow. As you can see, the color is not as bright as the other mediums. But it’s great that it’s not as chalky or dusty as soft pastels.

Gallery Soft Pastel – I must say that this has produced a beautiful kind of yellow that I really like. The texture of soft pastels can be very dreamy and dramatic at the same time. Unfortunately, I’m allergic to soft pastels and will have to wear a dust mask every time I use them.

Using Burlap for Your Art and Craft Projects

While searching for materials to use as gift wrapper, I chanced upon my small collection of printed tissue paper and native burlaps. I hadn’t thought about using burlap again for any of my art or craft projects until yesterday, when I realized that I could cut them into small rectangles and use as background for gift tags. I think I’ll do that when I begin wrapping presents for Christmas!

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In the meantime, I might be working on another canvas art and will be using burlap AGAIN for creating texture and for stenciling. I don’t know how else I could use burlap, though I read from a website that you can make your own table cloth and other home decors using this material. I like that it’s environmentally friendly and cheap. Yup, I got my 12×12 native burlap for only Php 35!

Anyway, I’ll post more burlap updates another day. It’s time tutor my little preschooler. :o)